Tuesday, May 22, 2012

JOHNSON CHURCH DESIGN TIPS

The inspiration for your new cathedral should never be a 1960's community college.

21 comments:

Regan said...

From my 5 y/o son, "Mom, what hospital is that?"

Keisha said...

That looks like an art museum. Or an apartment complex.

Fradgan said...

This is clearly one of those post-Christian Episcopal churches.

DJ said...

Or the Command Center from Power Rangers...

Anonymous said...

Unfortunately, (in case you didn't know) it's the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels in el Pueblo de Nuestra Senora la Reina de los Angeles in southern CA...

Anonymous said...

I am a Priest in the Archdiocese of Los Angeles and watched as this Cathedral was built. To me it looks like a men's prison on the outside and a great concert hall on the inside. The ONLY beauty in the place is in the basement where the windows from the old Cathedral (St. Vibiana's) were placed and lighted from behind.

On the positive side, the place seats a lot of people, it's huge. And the altar is the focus from everywhere in the building.

Other than that, I'd really rather celebrate Mass in the tiny chapel of our convent here at the parish.

The Underground Pewster said...

I thought it was a new airport terminal.

OlDave said...

Just out of curiosity, is the interior layout at all user friendly for the purpose of worship and other church activities?

Father Josh said...

This is Mr. Spock reporting in from the Vulcan High Command

Jordan Guernsey said...

@DJ - Yes, exactly.

Mark in the Heartland said...

Ugly, like beauty, is in the eye of the beholder. I instantly recognized this as the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels in Los Angeles. A friend has played the organ there in concert. (And he said it was a great space!) But, just because some of you think it's ugly, does that mean that only European inspired traditional architecture can be considered to be a "beautiful" church building? What ever happened to the idea that the church is universal? Shouldn't we allow for other than caucasian euro-centric designs? I don't have to be in a building transplanted from Europe.

Daniel Latinus said...

No Mark, the design of this building is the epitome of a certain type of Caucasian, Euro-centric mindset. Non-caucasian, non-euro-centric peoples would never design anything this ugly.

TLF+ said...

I won't refute some of the snarks above... many folks in L.A. said same when it went up (I lived in SoCal at the time). But in the interest of balance:

The crypt is amazing - both for the bright, almost radiant marble and the sheer size. It captures the "communion of saints" theme in the sanctuary. You sense all of the faithful, across time, working and resting in hope of the resurrection.

The location is fabulous. It truly sits as the cathedral of the city - it is as prominent to downtown as the L.A. Music Center, City Hall and other civic buildings. And it's right over the 101 Freeway as it winds through downtown.

Fr. John said...

A rather dreadful pile, isn't it?

Denita Arnold said...

More like a 1980s community college..

Anonymous said...

Is it true that it's called the "Taj Mahoney" in San Francisco?

Well, maybe it will survive the next earthquake, when the San Andreas fault decides to act up again ...

Zwetschgenkrampus

NancyP said...

It's much, much nicer on the inside, truly. The tapestries of the saints are amazing.

Gail Finke said...

I am not a fan. Having said that, I've looked at the web site and many photos (I live in Ohio) and it's a very nicely done example of that sort of architecture. If you like it, that's pretty much what it's supposed to look like, and the feeling it evokes (that kind of architecture is all about "evoking") is exactly what it's supposed to evoke. So I have to give it this: It is a fabulous example of that style of architecture. But again, I don't like that style of architecture. It is supposed to be people-centered, but to me it is very impersonal.

a Valley Girl said...

The tapestries lining the nave are remarkably moving.

Fr Theodore said...

Well, the etched glass is nice...

Anonymous said...

Tom Wolfe's From Bauhaus to Our House explains it all.