Sunday, July 18, 2010

THINGS THAT ARE NOT SINS

Clashing with the ecclesiastical décor.

32 comments:

Stuart said...

It may not be a sin, but surely it's illegal...

Elephantschild said...

I think I need a Benedryl. That's a lot of flowers.

Nickie Goomba said...

One need only add a unicorn and a gaggle of rainbows and one will have achieved Episcopal high church 2010.

Anonymous said...

Is it just me or are most - if all all - of these abominations from the Episcopal Church?

I'm Orthodox, but I really do believe the best response is to mercilessly mock them.

Rather like one should respond to their liturgy for pets, or the idea of opening women's monastic orders to male bishops.

pastor schuster said...

"Anonymous said...
Is it just me or are most - if all all - of these abominations from the Episcopal Church?"

Yeah, what's up with that?
Really like the new look for the website.

Pax

Christopher Johnson said...

The Catholics occasionally come up with some good entries. There's even one entry here somewhere or other that my contributor told me was Orthodox and Lutherans are represented here more than once. But I spent the first 48 years of my 54 years as an Episcopalian so I'm not piling one but I have to honestly say that my old church retired this trophy.

Anonymous said...

It kinda' looks like a Kindergarten teacher's weekend gig.
I was just wondering if it isn't just a bit "girlie" for one of these wannabe "priests"?

Anonymous said...

The 10:34 post above by a different "Anonymous" reminds me of what I thought when I first saw the photos of KJS in her purple haze vestments: like a little girl playing dress-up in her daddy's clothes. And you can take "daddy" however you like. This set is, indeed, very girlie.

Anonymous said...

I see Holly Hobbie got ordained.

Untamed Shrew said...

My childhood bedspread looked EXACTLY like that. Honest.

Anonymous said...

This is the legend in her own mind Elizabeth Kaeton (blog: 'Telling Secrets').

The blogs, 'Stand Firm in Faith' and 'VirtueOnline', have some interesting stories about her.

The Holy Cross means little to her it seems; rather,
The Divine Venutian Holosphere (or 'circles' to you) is the preferred object of worship she preaches. (see her blog)

Tory W. Sumrall said...

The ultimate irony here is, of course, that the subject of ridicule actually has this site listed on her blogroll . . . I think we're doing her a service, pointing out her liturgical errors. Maybe she'll comment and thank us!

Declan Rourke said...

"...having a form of godliness but denying its power. Have nothing to do with them..."

midwestnorwegian said...

"Cruel Crewel"

Anonymous said...

Somewhere in the US there is a bathroom missing its shower curtain and window treatments.

Elizabeth Kaeton said...

Boyz, Boyz, Boyz. Your jealousy is showing. Very unseemly. Very un-Anglican. Indeed, very un-Christian.

Anonymous said...

Elizabeth - we're not all boyz here. There are even liberals who enjoy this site. And I fail to see what is "un Christian" about telling the truth. Has TEC gone so PC that disagreement is perceived as not Christian? The woos factor from TEC is stunning - it's as disingenuous as Fox news calling Obama a racist.

I'm a girl, a liberal, loathe Episcopal priest Barbie, think what you're wearing destroys any credibility in what you might write or say, and after 20 plus years working in parishes, have walked away from going to church because of this kind of hubris and disconnect.

PS - I am posted as "Anonymous" because when I use my real name, it does not get posted on this site. But we have many mutual friends of FB.

Elizabeth Kaeton said...

Dear Anonymous - First let me say that you can always sign your name at the bottom of your post before you "hit" send. That way, even though blogger will not record your name, it will be recorded in the body of your comment.

As for these vestments, well, beauty is in the eye of the beholder, is it not? Some like classic Renaissance style like Michelangelo, others like a more modern style like van Gogh, others like cubist style like Picasso. Beyond personal taste in art, all these artists glorify God with their expressions of the beauty of God's creation.

The artist who designed and created the vestments for "the Green Season" is Colleen Hintz, founder and owner of Fruit of the Vine. She is very talented and very creative, having made vestments for Bishops Singh, Croneberger and Beckwith, as well as many ordained priests and deacons. The cope she made for Bishop Croneberger is particularly spectacular. It depicts scenes from the riches of God's bounty in the Diocese of Newark. All of her vestments are made with creativity inspired by the Spirit, careful thought and prayers of discernment All of her works are intended to glorify God in each their own way.

Do visit her web page. You will see all of the vestments I mentioned above, in addition to her series of quilts she made which depict the patterns used as signals and directions for those traveling the Underground Railroad. If you contact her, she will come to your church or civic organizations with a presentation that is both educational and inspiring.

At the very least, her web page will give some of those who frequent this blog a place to empty the venom some of you all obviously carry about ordained women in particular and The Episcopal Church in general.

I have placed this blog on my blog roll and visit it occasionally as a way to keep in touch with the sad reality of this particular time in our church. And, I admit, from time to time, to look at some of what the brothers and sisters in Christian community (not all of whom are Episcopalian) have, inspired by the Holy Spirit, fashioned or commissioned to express their relationship with God through Christ Jesus.

Yes, from time to time I gasp and think, "Oh dear." I do that when I look at works of art in museums, too. That does not diminish one iota the work of the artist.

If some of you wish to take your displeasure over the artistic works and make that a commentary on whatever it is that makes you angry or unhappy about The Episcopal Church or ordained women, that neither diminishes the church or the status of ordained women nor the credibility of either. It is only a reflection on you.

I hope you find peace.

I look forward to learning your identity - especially if we are FB friends.

mundabor said...

I wonder whether the wannabe "priestess" in the picture is the owner of a flower shop?

Anonymous said...

I was going to leave a post that suggested two unicorns for the table piece and one for the vestment
but then I read the post from Elizabeth Kaeton
I have to admit Ms. Kaeton speaks eloquently about this type of vestment art.
But what I thinks she fairs to understand,
some of us think this kind of art belongs in post modern museums and not as a part of worship.

Gail F said...

I read what she had to say. It's still ugly.

WeepingCross said...

You see, Ms Kaeton, your comment shows that you completely misunderstand both what I think is the purpose of this blog and why some of us cringe at some of what turns up in so much modern worship. Put simply, the Christian liturgy isn't a vehicle for artistic self-expression; for making points of our own, however worthy they may be. It's one of the chief means by which God remakes us and refashions us into something like what we could be. It isn't ours to take over for our own purposes. The fact that all your eloquence is devoted to arguing the other way around is exactly the problem.

Christopher Johnson said...

Ms. Kaeton? Let me try once again. It's not supposed to be about you. When I look at you, I don't care even a little bit about what you think is significant or interesting or meaningful.

I really don't want to have to figure out your symbolism, I haven't got the time. When you process in, your only job is to direct ALL my attention to HIM.

That's it.

Anonymous said...

I'm straining to identify the humility.

James said...

Of the many types of "should be a sin" vestments I've seen in my 52 years, this is not that bad. Not to my preference, but it's not that bad. And yes, I'm' an Episcopalian with GOOD taste.

James

Cantor Nikolaos said...

I have a difficult time thinking of that as a liturgical vestment. Vestments are not supposed to reflect the whims of the designer or the wearer.

Beverley said...

Shame on you, Elizabeth, for invoking and accusing malice against ordained women as some sort of defence here. As one, I find it extraordinary that that is the reading you get from this. This is not a woman thing. Nor is it a lesbian thing.

Perhaps you haven't seen the scores of men who are represented on this site as well. In fact, they outnumber us.

The simple fact, as stated by those before me, is that you have perverted altogether the meaning and purpose of liturgical vestments. Though, perhaps, it should be said that the perversion begins with the invention of these so-called 'liturgical seasons'. What's the point of creating these colourful diversions from the actual lectionary? Are the 'seasons' thought up just so priests have the opportunity to disgrace themselves this way? I'm just titillated by what will be donned when 'gay rights' season or 'immigration rights' season rolls around. Good God.

The reality is, as also has been said, that vestments are to supersede your identity and personality. They can be ornate, sure, but really ought to remind someone of something actually liturgical or even vaguely Christian, don't you think? You may have just as well walked in and said Mass in your civvies, because these are clearly more about you than God.

Also, do you really expect that any successors of yours at your parish would ever share your enthusiasm for something so clearly of a very personal and particular taste? I wouldn't want to be the one to be handed down an entire sacristy closet of these.

Beverley+

Anonymous said...

Wonders what vestments Jesus and his followers wore at the first supper...

They had no lace I'm sure, and, in light of the purported tastes here, I'm sure would be seen as tasteless, tacky, and/or disrespectful of "worship", which, if I'm not mistaken, is a take off on an informal gathering of friends for dinner.

Vestments are basically preposterous in all forms.

Eileen

Dave H said...

Of course Jesus didn't need special clothing. Read Chris' post above. Vestments are the uniforms that clergy wear to direct our attention to...JESUS.

Even having said that, I know of nobody on this blog who would consider ridiculing a plain white alb.

Michael said...

Um, Ms. Kaeton, it is your right to believe what ever you want. Likewise, we have the same right. If you find this blog un-Christian, fine.....move on then.

FrKnowsBest said...

Yeah the vestments are over the top and then some. Get over it.

OOooooohhhh it's a woman in those vestments. Get over it. Episcopalians ordain them. (And Roman Catholics, watch out: the current favorite for next pope wants to reopen that conversation....)

First thing I saw when I looked at this one was the lack of a proper amice to cover the clerical collar. Aesthetics aside, that's the major "liturgical violation" in this pic.

Priorities, people... priorities.

Anonymous said...

The Episcopal Church needs more Portuguese lesbians, not less!