Monday, October 26, 2009

YOU SHOULDN'T HAVE

My correspondent informs me that this stole was a gift which, I guess, makes it the liturgical equivalent of those SpongeBob SquarePants or My Little Pony neckties your kids get you for your birthday or Christmas. No matter how embarrassed you might feel, you've got to wear them and you've got to wear them more than once.

I'm not really sure what's going on here yet. I guess that thing at the top is the sun although don't hold me to that. As for the rest of it, I'm stumped.

21 comments:

Scott Diekmann said...

I think they got that one at the Good Will.

Steve said...

Looks like some sort of a wide road which leads to the...Sun.

I wouldn't mind lining my birdcage with it.

Roger said...

It's a windmill. If you held the two sides together you could see it better, but it's one of these: http://www.kushaiah.com/windmill/images/windmill-c.jpg

Maybe it's just because I'm from Oklahoma and I'm used to seeing them.

Roger said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Aelred said...

I agree with Roger. The top part is the head of an old fashioned windmill against a blue sky. That must mean the bottom part is fields and soil of a rural landscape.

Fr Craig said...

I suspect many of these were gifts... an assistant bp. here has a 'green' set (much more blue...) that are handmade for him as a gift. I think they are atrocious for worship, violating the canon rule here (not about me), but as art, I had to admire them. I suspect many of these folks feel obligated to where this stuff...

Zelwyn Heide said...

The markings closest to the inside do indeed seem to be the tower of the windmill, although the split makes it hard to see. I am not sure what meaning this is supposed to convey. Any guesses?

Anonymous said...

Clearly, we have a windmill and furrows. A great vestment for Rogation Day, don't you think? (right......)

Rev. Allen Bergstrazer said...

The road to perdition is strewn with many a hewn windmill?

Besides the obvious, this stole has the problem of many home/hand made vestments. Often they're ill fitting around the neck, they don't drape properly because of insufficient backing, and often are too short or occasionally too long. It's not only annoying to have a stole you don't like and have to wear it; but when it keeps flopping about and turning inside out and such makes it doubly so.

Anonymous said...

Easy solution for those "gift" stoles that are atrocious: Put on a chasuble. You're wearing the gift, but no one has to see it.

IggyAntiochus said...

Well, it could be worse. It could be the clown mass!

I am wondering, is it common to wear this kind of garment with a stole? It appears to be more of an assisting minister garment than that of a celebrant. The assisting ministers usually aren't sporting the stole or chasuble.

That being said, this type of garment is not found in my tradition, so I am open to further discussion or correction.

Anonymous said...

I would love to give that as a gift to our pastor. He is the one that thought it was so hideous that he had to send this link out.

Anonymous said...

IggyAntiochus, that minister is vested in a cassock and a surplice. The surplice is a shorter version of an alb. It is common in Catholicism and Anglicanism for concelebrating priests to vest in this with a stole, and it is common in both for priests to vest for non-Mass worship services in this and a stole, although not as much any more.

I believe pastors in the ALC wore this with a stole for Sunday services.

Catholic altar service often wear it, and it is often seen at the Vatican on priests who are assisting in some function at Mass but not concelebrating.

I happen to like the look of a cassock, surplice, and stole.

IggyAntiochus said...

Thanks for your explanation, Anonymous.

marlene said...

In this case the stole is wearing the man.

Warren said...

Grist, the Alfalpha and No-mega.

Anonymous said...

If we may be permitted a bit of artistic interpretation, this stole is actually quite easy to read. At the top is the sun, in a clear blue sky. then the horizonn and converging lines indicating a road to the horizon. Then, further down, on the road, chicken tracks.

Thus this stole asks the immortal question: "Why did the chicken cross the road?"

And the traditional answer - "To get to the other side," tells us that we should be looking at the other side of the garment, and this stole is being worn wrong side out.

revsarah said...

I was given a horrid, cheap pink stole. The Rector claimed it was for Rose Sunday in Advent; the Deacon asked him if he really wanted me to think they hated me. It was a gift, but I certainly never wore it!!

Cantor Nikolaos said...

Notice the person in the picture had the self-respect to hide his face!

Anonymous said...

It's the sun beaming over the road better not travelled.

Anonymous said...

Why is the face hidden? Is the picture from Reaaders' Wives?